"Statue of Liberty" fine art print - Signed by the artist from The History List Store
The History List

"Statue of Liberty" fine art print - Signed by the artist

Regular price $ 48.95

Updated December 2: We are now past the deadline to order. Thanks to all who ordered. We will have these printed, signed, and sent to you in time for Christmas gift-giving.

This special 2018 gift was made available to people who subscribe to our Insider newsletter. If you would like to be notified of other special opportunities, new products, and new designs, subscribe here.

— Lee Wright  |  The History List  |  History Camp


Limited printing. Deadline to order is December 2.

 

November 20, 2018

Given the times in which we live, it was suggested that I add a note explaining why I selected this for our special edition holiday gift.

This striking print, "Liberty Enlightening the World," was created a few years ago and the artist, Larry Stuart, and I have been discussing offering it in some fashion for more than a year, but other projects have come up, including the "One if by land, two if by sea" art that he created and was available as a limited run print. (While it is is no longer available as a print, it does appear on a limited run shirt.)  Larry also designed this year's History Camp Boston poster and shirt recognizing the occupation of Boston by British troops 250 years ago.

Over the last few months I've been working on what to offer as a special gift for Christmas and the holidays.

Last year we offered a scarf with "Life, liberty, and the pursuit of history" woven in and it sold out quickly. It was uniquely ours, limited, outstanding quality—and very popular.

After looking at a wide variety of possible products using existing and new art, I selected this print for the universal appeal of the message, "Liberty Enlightening the World," which I thought would be very meaningful to people who love history regardless of the era or type of history they find most interesting. 

I also think the art is very striking. Not the entire statue pictured, just the torch, "enlightening world," and the lettering and layout. As with all of Larry's work, it is original in every way, a rarity in today's world of millions of images and tens of thousands of fonts available with a few keystrokes.

There wasn't then and isn't now any political or philosophical motive for my selection. In fact, it wasn't until I was about ready to publish this tonight that one of our regional editors pointed out to me that some might interpret this as a political statement.

This note is one result, and I've also decided that this won't be promoted on social media. 

The art will be printed with archival inks on archival paper and signed by the artist. We will only print as many as are ordered by midnight (Eastern) December 2.  If our earlier limited run prints are any indication, there will only be a few dozen printed. We have no plans to print these again, so if you are interested in this print, place your order now.

Overall, it's a striking image with stirring text from the poem, signed by the artist. Very few will be printed, all archival quality, making it a very special gift. And a print I can't wait to frame and hang in my home. I hope you feel the same way.

— Lee Wright  |  Founder  |  The History List  |  History Camp 

P.S. To give you an idea of the breadth of things we considered this year, a set of Revolutionary Superheroes cookie cutters made the short list.  (They would have been too expensive in the quantities we anticipated, but we hope to do them in the future.)


 Description

This original art was created by Larry Stuart. It will be printed with archival inks on fine art grade 100% cotton rag, acid-free archival paper. They will be signed by the artist.

→ The deadline to order is December 2. We will only print as many as are ordered. 

Sizes: 14" x 11"

Shipping: $4.95 flat fee regardless of the number ordered. 


 The history of the Statue of Liberty: Liberty Enlightening the World

"The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the French people commemorating the alliance of France and the United States during the American Revolution. Yet, it represented much more to those individuals who proposed the gift.

"In 1865, Edouard de Laboulaye(a French political thinker, U.S. Constitution expert, and abolitionist) proposed that a monument be built as a gift from France to the United States in order to commemorate the perseverance of freedom and democracy in the United States and to honor the work of the late president Abraham Lincoln.

"Laboulaye hoped that by calling attention to the recent achievements of the United States, the French people would be inspired to create their own democracy in the face of a repressive monarchy. In 1865, France was divided between people who were still committed to the monarchy and people who supported the Enlightenment ideals (the belief that people had natural rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness). It was the hope of many French liberals that democracy would prevail and that freedom and justice for all would be attained. . . .

"'Liberty' was a controversial idea in the 19th century. To many people it suggested violence and revolution. Laboulaye and Bartholdi agreed that their monument should not be seen as leading an uprising, but rather as lighting the way, peacefully and lawfully. A key element was the name they gave to the Statue: Liberty Enlightening the World. Bartholdi's public monuments hailed back to classical images of a powerful, honorable national authority over any ideology. His statue of "Liberty Enlightening the World" would be above conservatism and liberalism and above radical revolutions and political turmoil. She would be an international symbol of liberty, justice, and democracy. In 1871, the Statue was transformed from idea into reality - it was to be funded, built, and presented to the United States." (1)

Building the statue and the pedestal

"It was agreed that the American people were to build the pedestal, and the French people were responsible for the Statue and its assembly here in the United States.

"However, lack of funds was a problem on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. In France, public fees, various forms of entertainment, and a lottery were among the methods used to raise funds. In the United States, benefit theatrical events, art exhibitions, auctions and prizefights assisted in providing needed funds. Poet Emma Lazarus wrote her famous sonnet “The New Colossus” in 1883 for the art and literary auction to raise funds for the Statue's pedestal.

"Meanwhile in France, Bartholdi required the assistance of an engineer to address structural issues associated with designing such a colossal copper sculpture. Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (designer of the Eiffel Tower) was commissioned to design the massive iron pylon and secondary skeletal framework which allows the Statue's copper skin to move independently yet stand upright. 

"Back in America, fundraising for the pedestal was going particularly slowly, so Joseph Pulitzer opened up the editorial pages of his newspaper, "The World," to support the fundraising effort. Pulitzer used his newspaper to criticize both the rich who had failed to finance the pedestal construction and the middle class who were content to rely upon the wealthy to provide the funds. Pulitzer's campaign of harsh criticism was successful in motivating the people of America to donate.

"Architect Richard Morris Hunt designed the Statue of Liberty's granite pedestal in 1884, donating his fee to help fund the Statue.  Financing for the pedestal was completed in August 1885, and pedestal construction was finished in April 1886. The Statue was completed in France in July 1884 and arrived in New York Harbor in June 1885 onboard the French frigate "Isere."

"In transit, the Statue was reduced to 350 individual pieces and packed in 214 crates. The Statue was reassembled on her new pedestal in four months’ time. On October 28, 1886, President Grover Cleveland oversaw the dedication of the Statue of Liberty in front of thousands of spectators. She was a centennial gift ten years late.

"The story of the Statue of Liberty and her island has been one of change. With the placing of “The New Colossus” on a plaque in the pedestal in 1903, Lady Liberty’s significance grew as an inspiration to immigrants who sailed past her on their way to America. The Statue was placed upon a granite pedestal inside the courtyard of the star-shaped walls of Fort Wood (which had been completed for the War of 1812). (2)

A poem to help raise money for construction of the pedestal

"This poem was written as a donation to an auction of art and literary works conducted by the "Art Loan Fund Exhibition in Aid of the Bartholdi Pedestal Fund for the Statue of Liberty" to raise money for the pedestal's construction. Lazarus's contribution was solicited by fundraiser William Maxwell Evarts. Initially she refused, but writer Constance Cary Harrison convinced her that the statue would be of great significance to immigrants sailing into the harbor.

"'The New Colossus' was the first entry read at the exhibit's opening on November 2, 1883. It remained associated with the exhibit through a published catalog until the exhibit closed after the pedestal was fully funded in August 1885, but was forgotten and played no role at the opening of the statue in 1886. It was, however, published in Joseph Pulitzer's New York World as well as The New York Times during this time period. In 1901, Lazarus's friend, Georgina Schuyler, began an effort to memorialize Lazarus and her poem, which succeeded in 1903 when a plaque bearing the text of the poem was put on the inner wall of the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty

"Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
MOTHER OF EXILES. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.

"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" . . . .

The references in the poem

"The title of the poem and the first two lines refer to the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, sometimes described as standing astride the harbor.

"The 'sea-washed, sunset gates' are the mouths of the Hudson and East Rivers, to the west of Brooklyn. The 'imprisoned lightning' refers to the electric light in the torch, then a novelty.

"The 'air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame' refers to New York Harbor between New York City and Brooklyn, which were consolidated into one unit in 1898, 15 years after the poem was written.

"The 'huddled masses' are the many immigrants coming to the United States (many of them through Ellis Island at the port of New York)." (3)

 

Sources: (1) National Park Service; (2) The Statue of Liberty Ellis Island Foundation; and, (3) Wikipedia

 

 


"Statue of Liberty" art © 2018 Larry Stuart 

 

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Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 19 28 9.25
Medium 20.5 29 9.5
Large 22 30 9.75
XL 23.5 31 10
2XL 25 32 10.25
3XL 28 33 10.5

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Short-sleeves

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 38 28 9.25
Medium 41 29 9.5
Large 44 30 9.75
XL 47 31 10
2XL 50 32 10.25
3XL 56 33 10.5

 Long-sleeves

Size Chest Body Length
Small 38 28
Medium 41 29
Large 44 30
XL 48 31
2XL 52 32

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 20 26.5 24.38
Medium 22 27.5 24.63
Large 24 28.5 24.25
XL 26 29.5 24
2XL 28 30 23.75
3XL 30 30.5 23.5

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 15.75 26.5 6.38
Medium 16.75 27 6.63
Large 17.75 27.5 6.88
XL 19.25 28 7.13
2XL 20.75 28.5 7.38

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Body Width Body Length
XS 15.6 26.5
Small 16.1 26.75
Medium 17.25 27.25
Large 18.38 27.88
XL 19.88 28.5
2XL 21.38 29.13

 

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 19 28 9.25
Medium 20.5 29 9.5
Large 22 30 9.75
XL 24 31 10
2XL 26 32 10.25
3XL 28 33 10.5

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
XS 14 19 6.5
Small 15.5 20.5 6.75
Medium 17 22 7
Large 18.5 23.5 7.25
XL 20 25 7.5

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 18 28 8.13
Medium 20 29 8.38
Large 22 30 8.63
XL 24 31 8.88
2XL 26 33 9.63
3XL 28 34 10.13
4XL 30 35 10.63
5XL 32 36 11.13
6XL 34 37 9.75

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Body Width Body Length
XS 12.5 23.5
Small 13.5 24
Medium 15.5 25
Large 17.5 26
XL 19.5 27
2XL 21.5 28

 

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
Small 16.5 26.5 24.625
Medium 17.5 27 25
Large 18.5 27.5 25.375
XL 20 28 25.75
2XL 21.5 28.5 26.5

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.

Size Chest Body Length Sleeve Length
XS 11.5 19 3.75
Small 12.5 20 4
Medium 13.5 21 4.25
Large 15 23 4.5
XL 16.5 25 4.75

Measurement Notes:
Sleeve length measured from shoulder edge.

Care Instructions:
Machine wash cold. Do not bleach. Tumble dry low.