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"One if by land . . ." Old North Special Edition Women's v-neck shirt

Regular price $ 29.95 USD
Regular price Sale price $ 29.95 USD
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Art created for Old North Church.

Includes Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's famous line, "One if by land, two if by sea," from his poem about Revere's ride. (See below for historical background and the entire poem.)

Comes with a hang tag that includes a historical quote, background on the event, and a small historical map.

The shirt:

  • Light blue - Printed on a 4.5 oz 100% USA grown cotton. Contoured and side-seamed for feminine fit.
  • Blue violet - Printed on a 4.3 oz polycotton shirt.
  • Compared to our other v-neck shirts, the neckline for these shirts are not as deep. 
  • See size chart.

This design is also available on a crewneck shirt for men and womentank top for women, shirt for kids, small posterpostcard, and a sticker.


Historical background

"Longfellow was inspired to write the poem after visiting the Old North Church and climbing its tower on April 5, 1860. He began writing the poem the next day.

It was first published in the January 1861 issue of The Atlantic Monthly. It was later re-published in Longfellow's Tales of the Wayside Inn as The Landlord's Tale in 1863. [The entire text of the poem appears below.]

The poem served as the first in a series of 22 narratives bundled as a collection, similar to Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, and was published in three installments over 10 years.

Longfellow's family had a connection to the historical Paul Revere. His maternal grandfather, Peleg Wadsworth, was Revere's commander on the Penobscot Expedition."

From Wikipedia

The Landlord's Tale

Listen, my children, and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five:
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry-arch
Of the North-Church-tower, as a signal-light,—
One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country-folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war:
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon, like a prison-bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

Meanwhile, his friend, through alley and street
Wanders and watches with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

Then he climbed to the tower of the church,
Up the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry-chamber overhead,
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,—
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town,
And the moonlight flowing over all.

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night-encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay, —
A line of black, that bends and floats
On the rising tide, like a bridge of boats.

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride,
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now gazed on the landscape far and near,
Then impetuous stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle-girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry-tower of the old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height,
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns!

A hurry of hoofs in a village-street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed that flies fearless and fleet:
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.

He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders, that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river-fog,
That rises when the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When be came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadows brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket-ball.

You know the rest. In the books you have read,
How the British Regulars fired and fled,—
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard-wall,
Chasing the red-coats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo forevermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

 

Our thanks to our regional editor, Larisa, for sharing a picture of her daughter wearing the shirt in dark blue.


 Design © 2018 Larry Stuart Studio.

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          Customer Reviews

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          E
          Ellen S.
          "One If By Land . . ." Old North Special Edition Women's v-neck

          Soft, comfortable quality made ladies v-neck t-shirt. Love the color and graphics. History List t-shirts are always a great value!

          S
          Stacy S.
          One If By Land t-shirt

          I just LOVE The History List. I taught high school history for 10 years, then stayed home for 18 years to raise my daughters. Now that I am teaching full-time again, I was DELIGHTED to find The History List. I grew up outside of Boston, and got to send my dad, now a Hilton Head Island resident the Old North Church, and the Mayflower Descendants t-shirts for Christmas. I happened to get both of those t-shirts for myself. My dad took us to New England cemeteries on "Sunday Drives" throughout my childhood. I would have said at the time that I hated them at the time, but they have turned out to be great memories, and a huge history lesson that fueled my passion for being a teacher of American History throughout my adult career life. The t-shirts remind me of our excursions through Boston, tracing the history of how we became America. And, my t-shirts provoke conversation with my scholars.
          Thank you for such amazing customer service, and quality products. I'm still trying to decide if I fit the "History Nerd" sticker, or the "History Teacher" one. I think that I am both!
          Thank you, for such an amazing company!

            ["Hidden recommendation","History buff","History lover","History student","History teacher","Limited","Old North Church","One if by Land","Revolutionary War"]